Tuesday, October 08, 2013

Your input, please

I had a lot of fun doing the makeup and hairstyle post on 17th century women the other day and I'm thinking of making it into a series. Personally I felt that it structured up the century for me and made it easier to spot when trends happened. I plan to make a 17th century post on men, next, but after that, well, what times period would you like to read about? Having started with the 17th century I have no plans to make it a chonological venture. So please, I would love suggestions, either here or on Facebook.

Also, if you are as exited as I am over Kendra's upcoming book on 18th century hairstyling, pop over to her blog and do a quick survey. Only three questions.

11 comments:

  1. Definitely do more as long as it doesn't stop you continuing to focus on the datelines that you are most passionate about. Looking back at when I was writing 'Artifice of Beauty', it did what I set out to do, which was to provide an overview of key styles and potions and how the changes across history as a whole, but having such a wide scope meant that I left out a lot of fine detail for any given dateline. One of the things I love most about your research is that you focus closely on one aspect and date at a time and look at it thoroughly.

    Its important to look at 'what comes before' when looking at 'now' (regardless of what date 'now' happens to be for the purposes of a post) but don't get sucked into trying to do every date at once and losing the detailed focus as a result.

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    1. My focus will definitly be on the 18th century, but at times I need a little break from it, and doing posts like this would be a little variation, as well as providing a context. But I'm not going to rush, just doing it when I feel the need to. :)

      And thank you! It means much to me that you appreciate what I do, as you came first, so to speak. :)

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  2. A series would be very welcome - as would more information about men and their costume!

    I also miss your previous post on just how poisonous lead and even mercury makeup really was (or, perhaps, was not) - tried to link it not long ago, but it was gone. It was a very nice counter to one of those ideas so many people have about "the past" that is so much more than it seems ...

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    1. I would definitly do both men and women! I might write about clothes, but not on this blog but on Isis' Wardrobe. :)

      The post on lead will be re-posted in some version eventually, but I don't have a date for it.

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  3. I'm interested in 16th century and earlier. A 16th century post as part of the series would be great!

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  4. Dear Isis,

    A 17th century series would be really nice. The end of the century and the very beginning of the 18th...the era of long, long bodices, and tall, tall fontange headdresses, would be neat. For all the attention the Sun King, Louis XIV had during his lifetime, he and his culture get short shrift among costumers today. I know your work on patches covers (pun intended!) that era well, but what about the rest of it? With the Robe de Cours mandatory at Versailles, did makeup reach down the neck and to the shoulders, for instance, since those were required, at the French court anyhow, to be bare (brrrrrrr)?

    Very best,

    Natalie

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    1. I will cover men in the 17th century shortly. :) As for teh 18th century, well, I will probably lay low on that era for a while as I'm writing about it elsewhere. :)

      But yes, Robe de Cours were mandatory on all official gatherings at Versailles. Makeup were used on all bare skin, except, some time, there earlobes, which at some portraits looks startingly pink. :)

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  5. I would love to see some posts dedicated to the stage make up of the 18th century. I am an opera singer and would love to recreate some of the original stagings including costumes and hairdo.

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    1. I'm interested in stage makeup as well, but so far I have only found very scant information about is- that they used a some kind of pencil or crayon of makeup to create lines in teh face to indicate age. If I find more, I will definitly put it to text!

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  6. I'm currently working on a german womans peasant impression during the 30years war of Germany (Think of Wallenstein) and would absolutly love to find more information about this!
    Thank you for all your hard work an dedication!
    Greetings from Germany
    Ingrid

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